Periodi ipotetici

Periodi ipotetici

Periodi ipotetici


Il periodo ipotetico, in inglese come in italiano, è sempre formato da due frasi: una if-clause (frase
secondaria introdotta da ‘se’) e una main clause (frase principale). Si distingue in tre tipi:

1. Probable (periodo ipotetico della probabilità): viene utilizzato quando l’idea espressa nella if-
clause è probabile.
If you do not give your permission for him to appear, he will not dare to do so.
Il verbo della if-clause è al presente, il verbo della frase principale è al futuro. Oltre al futuro, nella
frase principale si possono trovare anche may/might per indicare una possibilità, may/can per
indicare un permesso, o must/should per indicare un obbligo:
If the fog gets thicker the plane may/might be diverted.
If your documents are in order you may/can leave at once.
If you want to pass the exam you must study.

2. Possible (periodo ipotetico della probabilità): viene utilizzato quando l’idea espressa nella if-
clause è possibile ma improbabile, o contraria ai fatti conosciuti.
If you were prepared to love, you would understand…
Il verbo della if-clause è al passato, il verbo della frase principale è al condizionale (would +
infinito). Oltre al futuro, nella frase principale si possono trovare anche might/could per indicare
una possibilità; nella frase principale si può trovare la forma continua:
If you tried again you might/could succeed.
If I were on holiday, I might be touring Italy.

3. Impossible (periodo ipotetico dell’impossibilità): viene utilizzato quando l’idea espressa nella if-
clause è impossibile, perché l’azione indicata nella if-clause non è avvenuta.
If the princess had asked, the king would have appeared.
Il verbo della if-clause è al past perfect, il verbo della frase principale è al perfect conditional
(would + ausiliare + participio passato). Oltre al futuro, nella frase principale si possono trovare
anche might/could per indicare una possibilità; nella frase principale si può trovare la forma
continua:
If we had found him earlier we might/could have saved his life.
If the car hadn’t been packed with luggage, I would have been coming with you.